Week 4

Proteases - an Investigation into the structure and function

Semester:

            This week’s chemistry seminar was on the topic of Investigating the Structure and Function of Proteases. The seminar was presented by Dr. Peter Lyons. Dr. Peter Lyons is an associate professor in the Department of Biology here at  Andrews University. Through years of study and hard work he along with a battery of undergraduate students and other faculty have uncovered a wealth of information about the function of proteases which aid in the conversion of food to fuels our bodies can use. Dr. Lyons was engaging throughout his entire presentation.

Investigating Structure and Function of Proteases

Semester:

Enzymes are at the forefront of biological metabolism, regulation and catalysis. Specifically speaking, carboxypeptidases are essential proteases excreted from your pancreas that break down peptides/proteins in your intestine. This week we had the privilege of having the “pseudo-biochemist”, Dr. Lyons,  from the biology department, here at Andrews University, come speak about his research on metallocarboxypeptidases, such as carboxypeptidase O. There are 23 different carboxypeptidases that all have distinct structures and have different proteolytic acitivity. Dr.

Nitrogen Management in Agriculture

Semester:

This week's ChemSem was brought to us by Dr. Neville Millar, Senior Research Associate at Kellogg Biological Station.Dr. Neville Millar is a graduate of Saint Andrews University which is not to be confused with Andrews University in Berrien Springs. The title of the presentation was “Nitrogen Management. His presentation consisted on the importance of nitrogen in agricultural applications. Dr. Millar’s research consists of the collection, analysis, and characterization of various soil types. His primary means of analysis is a gas chromatograph.

Nitrogen Management

Semester:

This week Dr. Neville Miller from the University of Saint Andrews talked to us about nitrogen management in agriculture. He explained how there is a general overestimation of how much nitrogen should be applied via fertilizer each year on crops. This excess nitrogen then is taken off the fields by runoff and carried down waterways such as the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico causing large algae blooms which create nitrous oxide.