Author's Bios

Authors and Co-Authors: Chapters 1 - 6

 

Authors and Co-Authors: Chapters 7 - 13

Chapter 1: Early Research: A Strategy for Inclusion and Student Success

Desmond H. Murray is Associate Professor of Chemistry at Andrews University, Chemistry Instructor for Berrien County Math Science Center, and Founder of Building Excellence in Science and Technology (BEST Early; www.bestearly.com). Over the last 20 years teaching both high school and college he has advocated for and facilitated seamless early research. Murray has mentored about 1000 students in early research experiences he describes as ‘incubators of innovators.’ He was recognized as the 2012 College Science Teacher of the Year by the Michigan Science Teachers Association for his ongoing passion, mission and work to realize the universal adoption of early research.

murrayd@andrews.edu, http://www.bestearly.com

James H. Hageman received his B.S. in chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and his Ph.D. in biochemistry at UCLA (1968) and was a postdoc at Yale University. As a faculty in Chemistry and Biochemistry at New Mexico State University for 29 years, he served as mentor for high school, undergraduate and graduate students and post-docs. Over 45 undergraduate students from historically underserved groups did research in his lab; several authored publications. He served as Graduate School Dean and V.P. for Research at Central Michigan University (2000-2006) and as Associate V.C. for Research at the University of Colorado, Denver (2006-2011).

hagem1jh@hotmail.com, https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-hageman-2596b752

Sherine O. Obare is a Full Professor and the Associate Vice President for Research at Western Michigan University. Her research focuses on nanoscale science, environmental chemistry and has significant experience in methods to improve student success. Dr. Obare’s research program has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, Army Research Office, National Institutes of Health, Department of Education, and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. She was named as one of the top 25 Women Professors in Michigan. She is co-Editor of ‘Green Technologies for the Environment’ and serves as Associate Editor for Journal of Nanomaterials.

sherine.obare@wmich.edu, https://wmich.edu/arts-sciences/directory/obare

 

Chapter 2: Advanced Chemical Research at Laguna Beach High School: High School Seniors Engaged in Authentic Laboratory Research

Steve Sogo has been teaching high school chemistry for 25 years. In 2006, he created the Advanced Chemical Research program at Laguna Beach High School to engage students in the processes of authentic scientific research. Trained as a bio-organic chemist at Harvard and Caltech, Sogo has been honored with the Amgen Award for Science Teaching Excellence (2008) and the Frey Scientific Award for Excellence in Inquiry-based Science Teaching (2013).

ssogo@lbusd.org, https://mylbusd.haikulearning.com/ssogo/home/cms_page/view 

Chapter 3: A Suburban High School's Perspective on Authentic Research Experiences for Students: An Overview of Research Pathways and a Discussion of the Benefits

Mark S. Hannum is currently the Division Manager for the Science and Technology Division at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Fairfax, Virginia.  He also directs the Neuroscience Research Lab and teaches advanced Physics courses at TJHSST.  Mark also has an appointment as a lecture in the School of Education at American University in Washington DC where he works with pre-service teachers.  He is a trained Physicists specializing in the analysis of complex dynamical systems including modeling the nervous system.  Before moving to his current position at TJHSST he was an Albert Einstein Fellow at the National Science Foundation in the Division of Graduate Education (DGE) where he worked to advance the training of graduate students by developing their communication skills of advanced scientific concepts to broad audiences as part of the NSF GK-12 program.

mark.hannum@fcps.edu, https://www.linkedin.com/in/mhannum

Chapter 4: Perspectives from a New York High School Science Research Enrichment Program Teacher

Erin Wasserman has been teaching high school chemistry and science research for 12 years. From 2010-2013 she built the Science Research Program at Fox Lane High School in Bedford, NY. She has attended and collaborated with many teachers and research programs both nationally and internationally to finely tune the details of running a successful program. She holds a masters degree in inorganic chemistry from Syracuse University and is a New York State certified teacher who has been awarded many grants to continue her work in the classroom. She is a New York City National Chemistry Day Coordinator and continues to be a very active volunteer in community science events.

Ewasserman602z@gmail.com, https://www.linkedin.com/in/erin-rent-wasserman-4281997

Chapter 5: Project SEED: A Catalyst for Young Scientists

Cecilia D. Hernandez is the Assistant Director of Endowed Programs in the Education Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS). She joined the Society in 1988 and for over 15 years has advocated and overseen Project SEED, a program that has provided early research opportunities to over 10,000 high school students from low income families. She also directs the ACS Scholars Program, a scholarship and mentoring program which encourages minority groups underrepresented in the science fields to pursue undergraduate college degrees in the chemical science, and the U.S. National Chemistry Olympiad. Prior to her tenure at ACS, she lived in Colombia, worked at Morrison Knudsen, then a U.S construction company, as an Associate Material Engineer; and at Exxon-Intercor (International Resources Corporation) as a Procurement Coordinator. She received a BS in Chemical Engineering, Universidad de America, Bogotá, Colombia, and a MA in Development Banking from American University, Washington, D.C.

C_Hernandez@acs.org, https://www.linkedin.com/in/cecilia-hernandez-16a28138

Chapter 6: Research at Predominantly Two-Year Campuses of Penn State

Lee J. Silverberg is Associate Professor of Chemistry at the Pennsylvania State University, Schuylkill campus, which has only undergraduate students. After earning his doctorate in Organic Chemistry from the University of Delaware in 1991, he began working in the pharmaceutical industry, engaging in process research and development.  In 2009, he decided to return to academia and pass his knowledge on to others.  He has made it a point to expose as many students as possible to research, and to date has supervised 48 students, mostly underclassmen, of whom 26 have been published in refereed journals. In 2016, he won the campus Research Award.

ljs43@psu.edu, https://sites.psu.edu/leejsilverberg/

Kevin C. Cannon is professor of chemistry at Penn State Abington College and a chemistry instructor at Temple University. He has been mentoring undergraduate researchers for 23 years, and has been a strong advocate for undergraduate research at both institutions.

 
 

Chapter 7: Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Experiences: The Power of Strategic Course Design

Brenda B. Harmon is a Professor of Pedagogy at Chemistry at Oxford College of Emory University.  She has a passion for designing innovative laboratory learning experiences that foster independence and scientific thinking skills in first and second year college students. Curiosity about how students learn scientific thinking skills has resulted in numerous scholarship of teaching and learning projects which she has shared with colleagues through presentations and publications. She has been honored by students with the Phi Eta Sigma Teaching Award and recognized with the Williams Award for Distinguished Teaching, the highest award for excellence in teaching at Emory University.

bharmon@emory.edu, https://open.library.emory.edu/profiles/bharmon/

Nichole L. Powell is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Oxford College of Emory University. She is passionate about exposing students to the research process by challenging them with problems that are difficult, yet within their reach, and allowing them to learn by making their own mistakes. Her current research centers around incorporating scientific inquiry into the first and second year curriculum. An advocate for science literacy and diversity initiatives, she serves as the Chair of the Minority Affairs Committee -Georgia Section of the American Chemical Society. She has been honored by students with the Phi Eta Sigma Teaching Award.

nichole.powell@emory.edu, Oxford College Faculty Spotlight - Nichole Powell

Chapter 8: Undergraduate Research at the Community College: Barriers and Opportunities

James A. Hewlett is currently Professor of Biology and the Director of Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing at Finger Lakes Community College in Canandaigua, NY.  In addition to teaching, he serves as the Executive Director of the Community College Undergraduate Research Initiative (CCURI) - a National $5.5M NSF funded program under the Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) program.  He is the New York Hub Director of the Northeast Biomanufacturing Center and Collaborative (NBC2) and is the President and CEO of STEMsolutions, LLC, a New York based consulting firm specialized in developing customized higher education solutions to STEM curriculum reform efforts.

James.Hewlett@flcc.edu, http://www.flcc.edu/offices/employee-profile.cfm?email=James.Hewlett@flc...

Chapter 9: Impact of Summer Undergraduate Research Experiences on Baccalaureate Success by American Indian Students

Glenn D. Kuehn is Regents Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus at New Mexico State University where he taught biochemistry and conducted research for 43 years. He also served as a program director for three major programs funded by the National Institutes of Health from 1974-2012, which implemented undergraduate research experiences as a means to enhance ethnic diversity in the national research workforce. Kuehn was the incipient research mentor for twenty students of Native American, African American, and Hispanic ethnicities who earned their PhD degrees and nineteen students of similar ethnicities who earned their MD degrees. He was recognized for these achievements by the National Science Foundation with a year 2000 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring.

gkuehn@nmsu.edu, https://chemistry.nmsu.edu/people/faculty/glenn-d-kuehn/

Chapter 10: Why Early Engagement in College Research is Important: Lessons Learned at Wayne State University

Joseph Dunbar

jdunbar@med.wayne.edu, http://www2.med.wayne.edu/physiology/facultyprofile/dunbar/dunbar.html

Julie O'Connor

julie.oconnor@wayne.edu

 

Chapter 11: The Science Prize for Inquiry-Based Instruction

Melissa McCartney, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at Florida International University (FIU) in the Department of Biology and the STEM Transformation Institute.  Dr. McCartney investigates the use of primary literature and authentic data sets in STEM teaching and learning. Before coming to FIU, Dr. McCartney was a Project Director in the Education and Human Resources (EHR) Directorate at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).  Her main project was “Science in the Classroom,” a resource aimed at making Science articles more accessible to students and the public.  Prior to EHR, Dr. McCartney spent five years at Science Editorial working on education and neuroscience manuscripts.  Prior to Science, Dr. McCartney was a Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies where she worked with the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine.  During her academic training, Dr. McCartney was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Neurology at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where she examined network dynamics in the hippocampus; specifically with regards to seizure generation in epilepsy.  Dr. McCartney completed her PhD in Neuroscience from The George Washington University and has a BS in Biochemistry from Binghamton University (SUNY).  Dr. McCartney sits on the Board of the Washington, DC chapters of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) and the Society for Neuroscience (SfN).

mmccartn@fiu.edu

Chapter 12: Lab Tales: Personal Stories of Early Researchers

See http://www.bestearly.com/labtalesauthors

 

Chapter 13: The Future of Early Research

Desmond H. Murray is Associate Professor of Chemistry at Andrews University, Chemistry Instructor for Berrien County Math Science Center, and Founder of Building Excellence in Science and Technology (BEST Early; www.bestearly.com). Over the last 20 years teaching both high school and college he has advocated for and facilitated seamless early research. Murray has mentored about 1000 students in early research experiences he describes as ‘incubators of innovators.’ He was recognized as the 2012 College Science Teacher of the Year by the Michigan Science Teachers Association for his ongoing passion, mission and work to realize the universal adoption of early research.

murrayd@andrews.edu, http://www.bestearly.com

James H. Hageman received his B.S. in chemistry at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and his Ph.D. in biochemistry at UCLA (1968) and was a postdoc at Yale University. As a faculty in Chemistry and Biochemistry at New Mexico State University for 29 years, he served as mentor for high school, undergraduate and graduate students and post-docs. Over 45 undergraduate students from historically underserved groups did research in his lab; several authored publications. He served as Graduate School Dean and V.P. for Research at Central Michigan University (2000-2006) and as Associate V.C. for Research at the University of Colorado, Denver (2006-2011).

hagem1jh@hotmail.com, https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-hageman-2596b752

Sherine O. Obare is a Full Professor and the Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Western Michigan University. Her research focuses on nanoscale science, environmental chemistry and has significant experience in methods to improve student success. Dr. Obare’s research program has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, Army Research Office, National Institutes of Health, Department of Education, and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. She was named as one of the top 25 Women Professors in Michigan. She is co-Editor of ‘Green Technologies for the Environment’ and serves as Associate Editor for Journal of Nanomaterials.

sherine.obare@wmich.edu, https://wmich.edu/arts-sciences/directory/obare